Types of Architectural Drawings: Architectural drawings are produced for a specific purpose, and can be classified accordingly.

Presentation drawings: Drawings intended to explain a scheme and to promote its merits. Working drawings may include tones or hatches to emphasize different materials, but they are diagrams, not intended to appear realistic. Basic presentation drawings typically include people, vehicles and trees, and are otherwise very similar in style to working drawings.

Rendering:  is the art of adding surface textures and shadows to show the visual qualities of a building more realistically. An architectural illustrator or graphic designer may be employed to prepare specialist presentation images, usually perspectives or highly finished site plans, floor plans and elevations etc.

Survey Drawings: Measured drawings of existing land, structures and buildings. Architects need an accurate set of survey drawings as a basis for their working drawings, to establish exact dimensions for the construction work. Surveys are usually measured and drawn up by specialist land surveyors.

Record Drawings: Record drawings are used in construction projects, where “as-built” drawings of the completed building take account of all the variations made during the course of construction.

Working Drawings: A comprehensive set of drawings used in a building construction project: these will include not only architect’s drawings but structural and services engineer’s drawings etc. Working drawings logically subdivide into location, assembly and component drawings.

  • Location drawings, also called general arrangement drawings, include floor plans, sections and elevations: they show where the construction elements are located.
  • Assembly drawings show how the different parts are put together. For example a wall detail will show the layers that make up the construction, how they are fixed to structural elements, how to finish the edges of openings, and how prefabricated components are to be fitted.
  • Component drawings enable self-contained elements e.g. windows and door sets, to be fabricated in a workshop, and delivered to site complete and ready for installation. Larger components may include roof trusses, cladding panels, cupboards and kitchens. Complete rooms, especially hotel bedrooms and bathrooms, may be made as prefabricated pods complete with internal decorations and fittings.

Traditionally, working drawings would typically combine plans, sections, elevations and some details to provide a complete explanation of a building on one sheet.

Modern working drawings are much more detailed and it is standard practice to isolate each view on a separate sheet. Notes included on drawings are brief, referring to standardized specification documents for more information. Understanding the layout and construction of a modern building involves studying an often-sizeable set of drawings and documents.

Reprographics:  Reprographics or reprography covers a variety of technologies, media, and support services used to make multiple copies of original drawings. Prints of architectural drawings are still sometimes called blueprints, after one of the early processes which produced a white line on blue paper. The process was superseded by the dye-line print system which prints black on white coated paper. The standard modern processes are the ink-jet printer, laser printer and photocopiers, of which the ink-jet and laser printers are commonly used for large-format printing. Although color printing is now commonplace, it remains expensive and architect’s working drawings still tend to adhere to the black and white / grey scale aesthetic.

Advertisements